Healing power

Sept14-250pxA campaign is under way to make basic surgical care a component of universal healthcare for one-third of the world’s population

As it stands today, an estimated 2 billion people lack access to the most basic surgical services that prevent premature death and severe disability. As a result, easily treatable surgical conditions can lead to devastating lifelong disability, social exclusion, economic hardship and even death. This situation has remained largely unknown and unrecognised by the global health community well into the last 30 years. Even less recognition is given to viable and simple solutions available to address these neglected surgical diseases in low and moderate-income settings. Thus, ‘essential surgery’, the thesis of defining these conditions and setting practical and realistic goals in alleviating the enormous burden of disease in many low-income countries, has become the primary goal of the International Collaboration for Essential Surgery (ICES).

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Fighting the odds

College Fellow Mr Tim Hargreave tells Mark Baillie  about his close involvement with the world’s largest surgical public health drive – to reduce the spread of HIV in Africa by circumcising 20 million men

“This is all about numbers; I’m sort of metamorphosing from a surgeon into a public-health doctor, and the point is that if you’re doing something for public health, it has to be cost-effective. So you don’t want to have to treat thousands of people to prevent one case.” Tim Hargreave launches into our interview with a level of enthusiasm that must be a valuable trait in one of the most ambitious projects for tackling the HIV pandemic.

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20 Years of Support for Surgical Research

Latest Research Report marks two decades of support for research during which time over £7m has been awarded to support surgeons across the world

As the Research Report shows, the RCSEd is continuing its support for surgical research, from those in the earliest training years to renowned career academics. The report includes prestigious awards such as the Robertson Trust Fellowship, the Cutner Travelling Fellowship in Orthopaedics and the John Steyn Travelling Fellowship in Urology.

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Assess all areas

Assessment methods for surgical trainers and trainees will come under the spotlight at a major conference in October

‘Who Makes the Cut? Assessment in Surgical Training’, the title of this year’s Faculty of Surgical Trainers (FST) conference, may seem dramatic to some, but with GMC accreditation for all trainers in secondary care coming in 2016, it is a theme that could become increasingly relevant over the next 12 months. Assessment – of trainers and trainees – is a broad and complex topic, and is reflected in the range of speakers at October’s event. The lineup of international experts offers a depth of experience and perspectives that include primary care, psychology and the military.

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Open and shut case

Open and shut case

EVAR is the treatment of choice for 65-year-old men with screen-detected AAA, but can it beat open surgical repair for long-term life expectancy? Leading specialists make their arguments for and against this modern approach

 

Against: Peter Stonebridge Professor of Vascular Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, and Wesley Stuart Consultant Vascular Surgeon, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, in the context of a population screening programme, is a prophylactic operation. Its aim is to remove the risk of early death due to aortic aneurysm rupture. There are no certainties of benefit for individual patients. There are two aspects to the risk–benefit equation: procedural risk (30-day perioperative mortality and morbidity) and long-term survival.

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The President Writes - March 2014

We live in a world where the concept of trust is widely debated and challenged. You only have to look at the court cases relating to mobile phone hacking and the national press. In the league tables of trustworthiness of public individuals, politicians and journalists come near the lower end but doctors are still qu…

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Time to even the score?

Crisis after crisis, complaint after complaint, concern after concern. Is it really the case that healthcare in the UK is more notable for its problems than its successes? Sometimes it does feel that way. One element of improving a service for patients is top-quality training. This is essential to develop younge…

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Soldiers, surgeons and a speaker

In the second part of our series on the Monro dynasty,   follows the family into the 19th century

he saga of the anatomist Monros took an imperial turn in the first half of the 19th century. David Monro (1813–77) son of , graduated in medicine from Edinburgh, but then migrated in 1…

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Measuring up trainee needs

Contrary to the findings of the Greenaway Report, more flexibility is required for future doctors to gain the skills necessary for consultant careers – so argues the Association of Surgeons in Training

he final report of the independent review led by Professor David Greenaway made recommendations regarding th…

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