Learning excellence

march cover 250From distance learning to surgical apps, technology is making it easier to educate surgeons across the globe. In this special feature, we examine the latest developments and successes starting with the award-winning Edinburgh Surgical Sciences Qualification

The year 2013 was a remarkable one for our surgical distance learning programmes. We always believed that the Edinburgh Surgical Sciences Qualification (ESSQ) was groundbreaking but it was really exciting to have the innovative Masters in Surgical Sciences programme recognised by the announcement at St James’s Palace in November that it had received the highest educational award available in the country. The Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education is only awarded every two years by the Royal Anniversary Trust, which seeks to ‘promote world-class excellence and achievement’.

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We're taking on the bullies

We're taking on the bullies

In December, a GMC survey found that surgical trainees had one of the highest reporting rates for bullying and undermining of all medical specialties. In response, RCSEd invited representatives from across the profession to discuss the extent of the problem and examine possible solutions

 

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Open and shut case

Open and shut case

EVAR is the treatment of choice for 65-year-old men with screen-detected AAA, but can it beat open surgical repair for long-term life expectancy? Leading specialists make their arguments for and against this modern approach

 

Against: Peter Stonebridge Professor of Vascular Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, and Wesley Stuart Consultant Vascular Surgeon, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, in the context of a population screening programme, is a prophylactic operation. Its aim is to remove the risk of early death due to aortic aneurysm rupture. There are no certainties of benefit for individual patients. There are two aspects to the risk–benefit equation: procedural risk (30-day perioperative mortality and morbidity) and long-term survival.

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Exploring the senses

Exploring the senses

In the first of a new series of specialty features, we look at the development and current status of ENT surgery. Cate Scally begins by charting the history of the discipline, starting as far back as c.1500BC

The specialty of ENT is, in historical terms, a fairly recent grouping. We are extremely fortunate to have in our number the retired ENT surgeon Neil Weir, who has dedicated a significant part of his life to gathering information and publishing an extensive history of our specialty, and it is his work I draw on here. Mr Weir has kindly let us use his knowledge in the expanded section on ENT that will feature in the redevelopment of the RCSEd Museum in 2015.

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RCSEd names Birmingham as base in England

RCSEd names Birmingham as base in England

New centre will allow more College events to be held nearer to the majority of the UK membership

On Monday 21 October, the RCSEd made an announcement that marked a major development in its 508-year history; it was to open a base in Birmingham, within a 100-mile radius of most of its UK members. The rationale behind the move is simple: to provide a better service for the membership. The new base will give the College’s UK membership a choice of where and how they interact with the RCSEd; where to attend courses, seminars and meetings.

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The President Writes - March 2014

We live in a world where the concept of trust is widely debated and challenged. You only have to look at the court cases relating to mobile phone hacking and the national press. In the league tables of trustworthiness of public individuals, politicians and journalists come near the lower end but doctors are still qu…

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Time to even the score?

Crisis after crisis, complaint after complaint, concern after concern. Is it really the case that healthcare in the UK is more notable for its problems than its successes? Sometimes it does feel that way. One element of improving a service for patients is top-quality training. This is essential to develop younge…

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Soldiers, surgeons and a speaker

In the second part of our series on the Monro dynasty,   follows the family into the 19th century

he saga of the anatomist Monros took an imperial turn in the first half of the 19th century. David Monro (1813–77) son of , graduated in medicine from Edinburgh, but then migrated i…

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Measuring up trainee needs

Contrary to the findings of the Greenaway Report, more flexibility is required for future doctors to gain the skills necessary for consultant careers – so argues the Association of Surgeons in Training

he final report of the independent review led by Professor David Greenaway made recommendations regarding th…

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