Surgical oncology

June2015 coverSurgeons' News Editor John Duncan writes; the President’s Meeting heard from specialists about numerous aspects of oncology care, including new possibilities in individually tailored treatments that could bring a dramatic shift in the battle against cancer.

Half of the population born after 1960 will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime. Cancer prevention and cancer treatment are, therefore, important to us as individuals as well as professionals. Surgeons have been talking about modern cancer care for centuries. Joseph Lister and William Halsted, performing radical mastectomy 150 years ago, were providing modern cancer care for that time. During my training, controversy surrounded the use of conservation surgery in breast cancer that now would be regarded as standard care. In modern practice, the issues relate to the individualisation of treatment for patients, and the possibility of using genomics or tailored immunotherapy to radically improve cancer outcomes. Determining the optimal size for cancer treatment units to enable both access to care and optimal outcomes for patients remains an issue. The President’s Meeting programme addressed these subjects.

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Ahead of the curve

Ahead of the curve

Surgeons’ News speaks to  Dr Teodor Grantcharov, holder of professorships in Toronto and Copenhagen and leading authority on simulation and assessment

Surgeons’ News: How did you become interested in surgical education as a  special field?
Teodor Grantcharov: I started working on this just before 2000 when I was a resident in Copenhagen. I chose surgery because I enjoyed operating, but I noticed that there was a lot of meaningless feedback from my cases. After operating, people I worked with just said, “That was a good job” or “You did very well”. At first, I was flattered and enjoyed it, but I was aware that with that type of feedback, I would never get better. So I started filming my procedures. I would get positive feedback at the time, but when I went home and reviewed the footage, I could clearly see aspects that could have been done better. I started thinking that we needed to improve the way we evaluate each other, and the way we assess performance and share feedback in a more structured way. I’m still trying things that I can do better when I review my performance, even though I’ve been practising for more than 15 years.

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Great strides

Panellists
Mr John Duncan
RCSEd Council Member and Director of Undergraduate Teaching (Inverness), University of Aberdeen
Dr Andrew Murray
RCPSG lead on physical activity
Dr Stephen Boyce
A&E specialist and SEM consultant
Ann Gates
Founder and Director of Exercise Works!
Beth Cameron
PR & Comms, Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine

As part of the College’s campaign on exercise and surgery, we invited a panel of experts to debate the promotion of physical activity as a healthcare benefit.

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It's a family affair

We celebrate 60 years of a classic surgery text, involving three generations of one family with College connections


In 1954, Edinburgh surgeon Eric Farquharson wrote a new book on operative general surgery as a guide for trainees. Sixty-one years later, the 10th edition of Farquharson’s Textbook of Operative General Surgery has just been published: two of the editors are his elder daughter, Margaret (pictured), and his grandson, James Hollingshead.

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